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The Tree of 40 Fruit is an ongoing series of hybridized fruit trees by contemporary artist Sam Van Aken. Each unique Tree of 40 Fruit grows over forty different types of stone fruit including peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries, and almonds. Sculpted through the process of grafting, the Tree of 40 Fruit blossom in variegated tones of pink, crimson and white in spring, and in summer bear a multitude of fruit. Primarily composed of native and antique varieties the Tree of 40 Fruit are a form of conversation, preserving heirloom stone fruit varieties that are not commercially produced or available.

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Using 600 poles of bamboo and 70 radiata pine logs all harvested locally, Taiwanese Artist Wang Wen-Chih created a massive installation that served as the entrance to the Woodford Folk Festival in Australia.

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James Garner and Diahann Carroll at the March on Washington

James Garner and Diahann Carroll at the March on Washington

leeanndufour:

Galaxy Dance Party

ponderation:

Reflections On Lake by Martin Elekanic

ponderation:

Reflections On Lake by Martin Elekanic

Moloka‘i Island, Hawaii

Moloka‘i Island, Hawaii

Micronesia

Micronesia

Galapagos Islands

Galapagos Islands

… somewhere in Scotland
Island of Skye, Hebrides

… somewhere in Scotland

Island of Skye, Hebrides

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Underside of a gecko’s foot. Those ridges are full of thousands of tiny setae, ‘hooks’ that allow these lizards to grasp onto nearly any surface, and in any orientation. Spider-Man employs a similar morphological adaptation. (at The Field Museum)

Gecko feet are waaaaaay near the top of the list when it comes to awesome animal adaptations.
But they don’t really “hook”, certainly not like Spider-Man does, anyway. Each of those setae is just one-tenth the width of a human hair and contains hundreds of tiny projections that are each less than half of a millionth of a meter wide. To put that in perspective, that means each projection is as wide as just two human chromosomes. That’s small.
Because they are so, so, so tiny, the geckos use atomic interactions and Van Der Waals forces to hold themselves on the wall. They are literally using the attractive forces between atoms to walk on the ceiling, with no liquid or adhesive to help. The , which is 1,000X cooler :)
I featured them in this video on Animal Superpowers:

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Underside of a gecko’s foot. Those ridges are full of thousands of tiny setae, ‘hooks’ that allow these lizards to grasp onto nearly any surface, and in any orientation. Spider-Man employs a similar morphological adaptation. (at The Field Museum)

Gecko feet are waaaaaay near the top of the list when it comes to awesome animal adaptations.

But they don’t really “hook”, certainly not like Spider-Man does, anyway. Each of those setae is just one-tenth the width of a human hair and contains hundreds of tiny projections that are each less than half of a millionth of a meter wide. To put that in perspective, that means each projection is as wide as just two human chromosomes. That’s small.

Because they are so, so, so tiny, the geckos use atomic interactions and Van Der Waals forces to hold themselves on the wall. They are literally using the attractive forces between atoms to walk on the ceiling, with no liquid or adhesive to help. The , which is 1,000X cooler :)

I featured them in this video on Animal Superpowers: